• ENKI Institute

The Importance of a Detox With an Increasing Presence of Heavy Metals

Our bodies rely on a sufficient supply of micro-nutrient content obtained from the food we eat. Only an adequate intake of proper nutrients allows us to counteract with the increasing pollution of modern, heavily populated environments.

When consumed in small amounts, some metals together with other trace elements, are vital for the body’s functions: the so-called essential trace elements copper, molybdenum, iron, iodine, manganese, selenium, chromium, vanadium, and zinc.


Image: Fotolia.

The Heidelberg study of centenarians and the German Study prove that 100 years ago, significantly fewer pesticides, heavy metals or other chemicals were in the soil and air than today. This burden has been growing significantly for the last 50 years. Also, electro smog, caused by the use of computers and mobile devices, has risen dramatically. At the same time, due to decades of intensive agriculture, the use of man-made fertilizers and industrial food processing and storage, micronutrient levels have notably decreased.


However, the detoxifiers of the body, such as the liver or kidney, have not changed. The detoxification function of the liver relies on specific amino acids, proteins and vitamins. These can be substituted by foods. Otherwise, toxins accumulate in the liver to an increasing extent and the likelihood of tumour growth increases.


Unlike trace elements, other metals such as aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, lead or mercury do not have vital functions in the human or animal metabolism but are absorbed by the body when there is a lack of essential micronutrients – even to a larger degree when less essential micronutrients are being present in the diet.


With a constant intake of toxic substances and simultaneous lack of detoxification of the body, these harmful metals are stored in organs, accumulated and cause dysregulation throughout the body – which can result in negative consequences for one’s health.


In order to support the liver during detoxification, the following can be done:


· No alcohol

· No unnecessary medication

· No sugar in form of table sugar or sweetened products

· Non-toxic personal care products and biological household cleaners

· No ready-made meals (no fast food/ no soft drinks)

· Increased water intake (2 to 3 litres of carbonated water per day)

· Various teas, 1-2 cups daily


Our product recommendation for the discharge of heavy metals


For the optimal and successful discharge of heavy metals, a combination therapy of the following active substances is suitable.


The most important dietary supplements for a detoxification:


· Bentonite / Zeolite (silicon)

· Spirulina / Chlorella

· Vitamin C / N-Actey-L-Cysteine ​​/ Glutathione

· Selenium / Zinc


In addition to strengthening detoxification, the following supplements may be helpful:


· Taurine

· Alpha Lipoic Acid / Astaxanthin

· Folic Acid and Vitamin B12

· Calcium

· Vitamin E

· Iron


To start your basic detoxification, have a look at our bestselling detox products here.




Sources:



1) DR. BURGERSTEIN, LOTHAR, HANDBUCH NÄHRSTOFFE, VORBEUGEN UND HEILEN DURCH AUSGEWOGENE ERNÄHRUNG: ALLES ÜBER SPURENELEMENTE, VITAMINE UND MINERALSTOFFE, 2012, 12. Auflage


(2) KURZWEIL, R & DR. T GROSSMAN, FANTASTIC VOYAGE – LIVE LONG ENOUGH TO LIVE FOREVER, Rodale-Verlag 2004


(3) RAHMAN M. INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH ON ARSENIC CONTAMINATION AND HEALTH. J Health Popul Nutr 2006; 24 (2): 123-128


(4) SINGH AP ET AL. MECHANISMS PERTAINING TO ARSENIC TOXICITY. Toxicol Int 2011; 18 (2): 87-93


(5) VAHTER ME. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ARSENIC-INDUCED TOXICITY AND NUTRITION IN EARLY LIFE. J Nutr 2007; 137:2798-2804


(6) VAN HALEM D ET AL. ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: A WORLDWIDE WATER QUALITY CONCERN FOR WATER SUPPLY COMPANIES. Drink Water Eng Sci 2009; 2:29-34


(7) ZWOLAK I ET AL. SELENIUM INTERACTIONS AND TOXICITY: A REVIEW. Cell Biol Toxicol 2011; doi: 10.1007/s10565-011-9203-9


(8) NEEDLEMAN H. LOW LEVEL LEAD EXPOSURE: HISTORY AND DISCOVERY. Ann Epidemol 2009; 19(4):235-238


(9) NAVAS-ACIEN A ET AL. LEAD EXPOSURE AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE. Environ Health Perspect 2007; 115(3):472-482


(10) PAGELS J ET AL. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MASS EMISSION FACTORS OF CANDLE SMOKE PARTICLES. J Aerosol Sci 2009; 40(3):193-208


(11) ROSIN A. THE LONG-TERM CONSEQUENCES OF EXPOSURE TO LEAD. Isr Med Ass J 2009; 11(11):689-694


(12) SANDERS T ET AL. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS AND BIOMARKERS OF LEAD EXPOSURE: A REVIEW. Rev Environ Health 2009; 24(1):15-45.


(13) SATARUG S ET AL. CADMIUM, ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE, AND HEALTH OUTCOMES. Environ Health Perspect 2010; 118:182-190


(14) PETERS JL ET AL. CADMIUM EXPOSURE IN ASSOCIATION WITH HISTORY OF STROKE AND HEART FAILURE. Environ Res 2010; 110(2):199-206


(15) NAWROT TS ET AL. OCCUPATIONAL CADMIUM EXPOSURE AND CALCIUM EXCRETION, BONE DENSITY, AND OSTEOPOROSIS IN MEN. J Bone Min Res 2010; 25(6):1441-1445


(16) NAWROT TS ET AL. CADMIUM EXPOSURE IN THE POPULATION: FROM HEALTH RISKS TO STRATEGIES OF PREVENTION. Biometals 2010; 23(5):769-782.


(17) POREBA R ET AL. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO LEAD, CADMIUM AND MANGANESE, BLOOD PRESSURE VALUES AND INCIDENCE OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION. Med Pr 2010; 61(1):5-14


(18) HOUSTON MC. THE ROLE OF MERCURY AND CADMIUM HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR DISEASE, HYPERTENSION, CORONARY HEART DISEASE, AND MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. Alt Ther Health Med 2007; S.128-S.133


(19) KHAN MA ET AL. MERCURY-SELENIUM COMPOUNDS AND THEIR TOXICOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: TOWARD A MOLECULAR UNDERSTANDING OF THE MERCURY-SELENIUM ANTAGONISM. Environ Toxicol 2009; 28(8):1567-1577.


(20) MUTTER J ET AL. DOES INORGANIC MERCURY PLAY A ROLE IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND AN INTEGRATED MOLECULAR MECHANISM. J Alzheimer’s Dis 2010; 22:357-374


(21) SAKAMOTO M ET AL. A REVIEW OF MERCURY TOXICITY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO METHYLMERCURY, IN: EDS: LIU G ET AL., ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY OF MERCURY, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2011, Kapitel 15


(22) SCHOEMAN K ET AL. DEFINING A LOWEST OBSERVABLE ADVERSE EFFECT HAIR CONCENTRATION OF MERCURY FOR NEURODEVELOPMENT EFFECTS OF PRENATAL METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE THOUGH MATERNAL FISH CONSUMPTION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW. Ther Drug Monitor 2009; 31(6):670-682.

28 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All